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Announcing CRWS's Spring 2014 Speaker Series:

Amy Binder, Associate Professor of Sociology, University of California at San Diego, "Right on Campus: The Political Styles of Conservative College Students" Thursday, February 6, 4:00-5:30pm

Carol Mason, Professor of Gender and Women's Studies, University of Kentucky, "Midwestern Roots and National Fruits: The Origins and Implications of Anita Bryant's Anti-gay Crusade," Thursday, February 13, 4:00-5:30pm

"Ukraine: A Panel Discussion" Sponsored by the Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies, and co-sponsored by CRWS. Panelists: M. Steven Fish (Professor of Political Science, UC Berkeley); Yuriy Gorodnichenko (Associate Professor of Economics, UC Berkeley); Andrei Tsygankov (Professor of Political Science, San Francisco State University); and Edward Walker (Associate Adjunct Professor of Political Science, Exec. Dir. of the Berkeley Program in East European and Eurasian Studies, UC Berkeley). Moderated by Jason Wittenberg (Associate Professor of Political Science, Acting Director of ISEES, UC Berkeley). Thursday, March 13, 2-14, 4:00-6:00pm, Maude Fife Room, 315 Wheeler Hall, UC Berkeley

"Will the Eurosceptics Topple Europe? The Rise of the Right and the European Parliament Election" A panel discussion featuring UC Berkeley scholars: Jason Wittenberg (Associate Professor, Political Science), Jeroen Dewulf (Associate Professor, German, and Queen Beatrix Chair and Director, Dutch Studies Program), Laura Fantone (Affiliated Scholar, Beatrice Bain Research Group for Critical Feminist Research), Gerard Roland, (E. Morris Cox Professor of Economics and Professor of Political Science, and Kimberly Twist (PhD Candidate, Political Science). Monday, April 8, 2014, 4:00pm, 3335 Dwinelle Hall, UC Berkeley. Co-sponsored by CRWS; European Union Center of Excellence; Institute of European Studies; and Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies.

More information about these events can be found here.  We hope you will join us!


"The Tea Party, the Government Shutdown, and Obamacare," by Lawrence Rosenthal (Foundation for Law, Justice and Society Policy Brief)

Obamacare has been the bête-noire of the Tea Party movement since its founding in February 2009. The current Tea Party tactic — shutting down the federal government unless Obamacare, currently being implemented, is defunded, delayed, or repealed — had its origin in the movement’s disruption of Congressional Town Hall meetings in summer 2009. Beyond its bombastic rhetoric and tactics, the Tea Party’s view of Obamacare is part and parcel of a theory of the US Constitution. This theory emerges from the ‘state-rights’ tradition in US history, and is expressed in the urgent conviction that the size of the US federal government and, in particular, liberal social policy, are destructive of the fundamental premises of the Constitution. Read more here.


"Where Appalachia Went Right" - Gabe Schwartzman

"In 2000, West Virginia’s electoral votes went for George W. Bush, one of the few times that West Virginia went for anyone but a Democrat after Franklin Delano Roosevelt. More unusual was that in 2000 the southern counties – the coalfields – had a majority voting for the Republican candidate, if by a small margin. That margin has only grown in the Obama elections, while, for the first time, Republican state representatives are being elected to coalfield districts. To understand the electoral transition this thesis looks to a concurrent trend in the Appalachian coalfields: the rise of “pro-coal” political mobilizations. What appears to be grassroots support for the coal industry, a claim this work argues has some validity, has overtaken the cultural and political landscape of the central Appalachian coalfields. This work relies on ethnographic data from the last four years that the author collected as an activist first, then as an undergraduate researcher, to examine the intersection of climate change politics, mountaintop coal mining, and the coalfields’ transition towards the Republican Party."

Gabe Schwartzman is a UC Berkeley Geography Major and CRWS mini-grant recipient.  This paper, which is Gabe's senior thesis, is now part of the CRWS Working Paper Series in the eScholarship Repository of the California Digital Library, and can be accessed here.


Steep: The Precipitous Rise of the Tea Party

Steep: The Precipitous Rise of the Tea Party (University of California Press, August 2012), edited by Lawrence Rosenthal and Christine Trost is now available from UC Press.

Description:

In the Spring of 2009, the Tea Party emerged onto the American political scene. In the wake of Obama's election, as commentators proclaimed the "death of conservatism," Tax Day rallies and Tea Party showdowns at congressional town hall meetings marked a new and unexpected chapter in American conservatism. Accessible to students and general readers,Steep: The Precipitous Rise of the Tea Party brings together leading scholars and experts on the American Right to examine a political movement that electrified American society. Topics addressed by the volume's contributors include the Tea Party's roots in earlier mass movements of the Right and in distinctive forms of American populism and conservatism, the significance of class, race and gender to the rise and successes of the Tea Party, the effect of the Tea Party on the Republican Party, the relationship between the Tea Party and the Religious Right, and the contradiction between the grass-roots nature of the Tea Party and the established political financing behind it. Throughout the volume, authors provide detailed and often surprising accounts of the movement's development at local and national levels. In an Epilogue, the Editors address the relationship between the Tea Party and the Occupy Wall Street movement.

To order a copy and/or read more about the book click here.


Bibliography of Academic Theses and Dissertations on the American Right

CRWS is pleased to make available Ernie's Lazar's extensive bibliography of academic theses and PhD dissertations on the American Right. Mr. Lazar has spent three decades collecting archival material on the right wing and is committed to making his work available to a wide audience of researchers. The bibliography is organized thematically and some of its citations go back more than 50 years. To our knowledge, this is the most exhaustive directory of its kind available on line or elsewhere.

Read more about the Bibliography here.


CRWS People for the American Way Collection of Conservative Political Ephemera and Broadcasting, 1980-2004, Now Available

In June of 2010, People for the American Way (PFAW) donated its vast and unique collection of political ephemera and video broadcasting on the American Right to CRWS.

The paper archive has been processed and is now permanently housed at UC Berkeley's prestigious Bancroft Library, one of the largest and most heavily used libraries of manuscripts, rare books, and unique materials in the United States, which is open to students and scholars from around the world.  Comprised of approximately 1,220 organizations, 300 individual files, and 80 rare right-wing magazines and newspapers, the Collection charts the flourishing movements of American conservatism from the 1980s to the early twenty-first century. The materials in the collection, which include organizations' and individuals' pamphlets, direct mailings, publications, speeches, conference programs, internal financial records, membership lists, fundraising strategies, voter guides, manuals, and biographies document the ideological orientations, policy positions, talking points, and organizational structures and strategies of hundreds of right-wing organizations, individuals, and publications. A large portion of the collection focuses specifically on documents associated with the "religious right." Of particular interest (due to scope) are materials pertaining to the American Family Association, Christian Coalition, Coalition for Better TV, Concerned Women for America, Family Research Council, the Moral Majority, and the Pat Robertson Papers. Additionally, there are comprehensive collections of the following publications: Charisma & Christian LifeChalcedon Report,ChronicleFocus on the Family and New American. Issues covered in the Collection include political strategy and tactics, taxation, race, guns, the judiciary, marriage, homosexuality, foreign policy, the military, and the role of religion in American politics. It is our hope that political scientists, sociologists, historians, legal scholars, policy makers, and other scholars will use the collection to illuminate our historical and social understanding of the American Right.

The video archive contains over 2,000 DVDs with content transfered from PFAW's videotape collection of network and cable braodcasting, widely documenting year-to-year developments among major figures and organizations of the right. Televangelist broadcasts occupy a good portion of the archive, including such television programs as Pat Robertson's 700 Club, The Old Time Gospel Hour, and Falwell Live, among others. In many instances the archive directory indicates the guests or issues covered on a particular show. The archive also includes speeches by important figures on the right (e.g. Ronald Reagan, Pat Buchanan); coverage of important Congressional proceedings (e.g. the Bork nomination); coverage of important conservative events (e.g., The Conservative Political Action Convention); and one-off productions on particular subjects by right-wing groups (e.g., Falwell's film on the Clintons, Circle of Power). The video archive is housed at the Institute for the Study of Societal Issues at the University of California at Berkeley, which is also the home of teh Berkeley Center for Right-Wing Studies.  Scholars who are interested in obtaining access to the video archive may contact CRWS Program Director and ISSI Associate Director, Dr. Christine Trost (ctrost AT berkeley.edu).

To read more about the materials in the Collection and how to access them, click here.

 


CRWS (formerly named CCSRWM) Featured in The Berkeleyan

"Right-wing studies? At Berkeley? Neither left nor right, the 2-year-old Center for the Comparative Study of Right-Wing Movements is leading the effort to fill a scholarship gap with roots in the Cold War."  Read the full article here.